LG window air conditioning unitIn part one of our buying guides we covered the mini split system, an energy efficient cooling option for homes without built in ductwork, but this is not your only option. In this post we’ll cover a couple of other popular options. First window air conditioners are one of the most popular choices for cheap easy cooling.

Window Air Conditioners

Window air conditioners are one of the most affordable air conditioning options available. Window units cost as little as a few hundred dollars, plus most homeowners with very limited DIY capabilities can install these air conditioners all by themselves. Low purchase costs, as well as substantial installation savings are the biggest advantages of this type of air conditioner. Window air conditioners offer homeowners almost instant cooling, simply decide you need an air conditioner in the morning, buy one, and have it installed that afternoon.

Before you buy a window air conditioner here are the pros and cons to consider.

Pros

  • Price – these units are easily the most inexpensive air conditioning option available, but remember the cheapest units are almost always the least energy efficient. So do your homework and always buy the most energy efficient window unit you can afford.
  • Free Installation – these air conditioners are almost as easy as open window, insert AC, close window, plug in, and enjoy. Almost but not quite, Murphy’s Law states “whatever can go wrong will go wrong” and although almost any homeowner should able to install their own window air conditioner be prepared for some unforeseen problem.
  • Cheap Installation – if you don’t feel comfortable installing your own window air conditioner the internet is full of “handyman” contractors who will install it for a few hundred dollars, which is by far the cheapest air conditioner installation option available to you. Even though this is a cheap and fairly easy home improvement project, do your research and make sure the contractor is reputable before you hire them.

Cons

  • Free installation – installing a window air conditioner yourself may save you some money but does not come without any risk. If you plan on installing your own window air conditioner be very careful falling air conditioners have caused serious injuries and even deaths. Be sure to secure the air conditioner during installation, and make sure it will stay secure.
  • Regional Cooling – Window units cool the room they are installed in they are not a whole house solution. Window air conditioners are very inexpensive but only cool a small area; therefore many units may have to be purchased to provide comfort throughout the house.
  • Home Security – when window units are not properly installed (and sometimes when they are) they can provide thieves with an easy entrance into a home.
  • Seasonal Installation – depending on the installation/insulation a window air conditioner may have to be removed in the winter and reinstalled each spring. Although this is a hassle just remind yourself how much money you saved by doing it yourself.

Like any AC option you decide to buy always purchase the most energy efficient unit you can afford and determine the size needed to cool your house/room.

We don’t sell Air Conditioners at AirConditioningServiceHQ.

That’s why we’ve partnered with someone who does.LivingDirect has been selling AC units online for over 13 years, and they’ve been selling appliances for three generations. They are an Internet Retailer Top 500 site.

LG 8000 BTU Window Air Conditioner
LG 8000 BTU Window Air Conditioner-Features a programmable on-off timer/thermostat. Plus lots more.

Regularly $312.49
On Sale $249.99

 

LG 7000BTU Heat & Cool Air Conditioner
LG 7000 BTU Air Conditioner Heat & Cool, Perfect for basement and rooms that need AC and occasional heating.

Regularly $424.99
On Sale $339.99

 

Prices subject to change without notice. Please check the LivingDirect website for current pricing.

The last ductless option I’ll cover is not ductless at all; in fact it uses small insulated flexible ducts to distribute cold air throughout the home. So why include them in a ductless air conditioning article? Read on.

High Velocity Small Duct Air Conditioning.

2 Inch High Velocity DuctworkHigh velocity air conditioners were invented as an easy alternative to retrofitting older homes with a whole house air conditioning system, and although this type of air conditioner uses ducts it is a highly specialized alternative to the traditional ducted air conditioner. The ducts are much smaller than the normal ducts used in standard forced air systems, just two inches. These ducts fit easily into the standard 2by4 walls of almost any home.

Installing a ducted system into a home after it’s been built is a very expensive proposition. In fact in older homes, log cabins or historic registered buildings in may be impossible. But adding a small duct high velocity (SDHV) system costs far less to install. In fact many times a unit can be installed in a home without tearing up walls or ceilings, Ducts can be run through existing walls via a crawlspace or attic, and run between floors thru closets.

The air handler (blower fan) for this system is small enough to fit neatly in most attics.

By design SDHV systems eliminate cold or warm spots in homes by creating an air flow to help circulate the cooled air.

If considering a SDHV unit you should look for a HVAC contractor that specializes in this type of system. Ask if they are certified by the manufacturer to install this type of AC system. Before you call an HVAC company visit What to Ask an Air Conditioning Contractor.

If you’d like to read more about the benefits of this type of air conditioner visit our High Velocity Air Conditioner webpage.

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